curators.mixremix.cc

Hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) in flight.JPG


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Charlesjsharp" on Sun, 23 Aug 2020 19:45:00 GMT
Added to category on Sat, 10 Oct 2020 21:01:22 GMT
Original image: 3780×2866 pixel; 5.325.234 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hyacinth_macaw_%28Anodorhynchus_hyacinthinus%29_in_flight.JPG

Wikimedia Commons media of the day for October 11

Media of the day
File:Hubblecast Light 106.webmPlay media
This virtural flight through the Orion Nebula, a nearby star-forming region. The video has been produced using scientific imagery and data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Problems playing the file?

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:FeedItem/motd/20201011000000/en

Music Public Domain 🎧 Hip Hop Rap 🌿 ! Ahh Reggae ! 🦁 BEAT Instrumental 2020🔥Background Music Relax

Music Public Domain 🎧 Hip Hop Rap 🌿 ! Ahh Reggae ! 🦁 BEAT Instrumental 2020🔥Background Music Relaxsubmitted by /u/Cold_Acanthocephala3
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Spafford Live at Ogden Theatre on 2018-10-27


Image/Photo
Spafford Ogden Theatre Denver, CO October 27, 2018 Source: Audio-Technica AT4031 (pair, approx. 13" and 110* apart), Audio-Technica AT853 (single, subcard cap, center of AT4031s, with AT8531 power module), Zoom F8 (24/48 wav) Location: DFC, directly behing SBD, approximately 9' high Transfer: Track ....

This item belongs to: etree/Spafford.

This item has files of the following types: Archive BitTorrent, Flac, Flac FingerPrint, Item Tile, JPEG, Metadata, Text
https://archive.org/details/spafford2018-10-27.AT4031.AT853sc

Wikimedia Commons media of the day for October 12

Media of the day
File:A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Liquid Water at 298 K.webmPlay media
A molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water at 298 K (25 °C) simulated with the TIP4P water model. Hydrogen atoms are in red and oxygen atoms are white. Hydrogen bonds are represented with dashed lines.

Problems playing the file?

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:FeedItem/motd/20201012000000/en


Build a Kubernetes Minecraft server with Ansible's Helm modules


Ship captain sailing the Kubernetes seas
One of the best outcomes of Ansible's move towards content collections is it spreads the thousands of modules in Ansible's "core" repository into many more independent repositories. This means movement on issues and modules that had long been delayed (often due to the sheer volume of issues and pull requests in the repo) can progress more rapidly.

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10 years of OpenStack, Kubernetes at the edge, and more industry trends


Person standing in front of a giant computer screen with numbers, data
As part of my role as a principal communication strategist at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends. Here are some of my and their favorite articles from that update.

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What is measured boot and trusted boot on Linux


Brain on a computer screen
Sometimes I'm looking around for a subject to write about, and realise that there's one that I assume that I've covered, but, on searching, discover that I haven't. One of those topics is measured boot and trusted boot—sometimes misleadingly referred to as "secure boot." There are specific procedures that use these terms with capital letters (e.g., Secure Boot), which I'm going to try to avoid discussing in this article. I'm more interested in the generic processes—and a major potential downfall—than in trying to go into the ins and outs of specifics.

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Install MariaDB or MySQL on Linux


Person standing in front of a giant computer screen with numbers, data
Both MariaDB and MySQL are open source databases that use SQL and share the same original codebase. MariaDB is a drop-in replacement for MySQL, so much so that you use the same command (mysql) to interact with MySQL and MariaDB databases. This article, therefore, applies equally to MariaDB and MySQL.

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Taming the upload filters: Pre-flagging vs. match and flag

One of the most important elements of any implementation of Article 17 will be how platforms can reconcile the use of automated content filtering with the requirement not to prevent the availability of legitimate uploads. While most implementation proposals that we have seen so far are silent on this crucial question, both the German discussion proposal and the Commission’s consultation proposal contain specific mechanisms that are intended to ensure that automated content filters do not block legitimate uploads, and that uploads are subject to human review if they are not obviously/likely infringing.

In order to achieve this objective, the German discussion draft published in June relies on the idea of “pre-flagging”: users would be allowed to flag uploads containing third party works as legitimate. Platforms would then be prevented from automatically blocking pre-flagged uploads unless they determine that the flag is incorrect because the upload is “obviously infringing”.

By contrast, the Commission’s implementation guidance consultation proposes a “match-and-flag” mechanism: if upload filters detect the presence of a third party work in an upload and the use is not deemed to be “likely infringing”, then the uploader is notified and given the ability to state that the use is legitimate. If the user flags the upload as legitimate, the platform will have to initiate a human review of the upload, which remains available from the moment of upload until the review has been concluded. This type of mechanism was first suggested by a group of copyright academics in October of last year. It is also at the core of the proposal that we had presented during the last meeting of the stakeholder dialogue.

Both approaches provide a mechanism that limits the application of fully automated upload filters (while implicitly acknowledging the fact that many platforms will deploy upload filters). In the Commission’s proposal, filters are limited to making a pre-selection (“is the upload likely infringing?”); in the German proposal, they can only operate on unflagged content and to filter out “obviously incorrect” pre-flags.

Convergence on “match-and-flag”?


Both approaches have been criticised by rightholders, who claim that they undermine the “original objective of the directive” without providing alternative proposals on how automated filtering can be reconciled with the requirement not to block legitimate uploads. In addition, the German discussion proposal has also been criticised by platforms such as Google and Facebook. The platforms are arguing that giving users the ability to pre-flag every single upload would be impractical and would likely lead to substantial numbers of unnecessary (where the content in question is already licensed) or unjustified (users making excessive use of the pre-flagging tool) pre-flags, which would make such a system impractical to operate at scale.

Netzpolitik.org has now published a leak of a new version (“Referentenentwurf”) of the German implementation law proposal. This version abandons the pre-flagging mechanism and replaces it with a “match-and-flag” approach similar to what the Commission has proposed (it also closely resembles a suggestion made by Google in its response to the German Consultation). However, there are also important differences between the two proposals, and based on a closer analysis it is clear that the new German proposal offers considerably less protection against unjustified blocking or removal of uploads than either the initial pre-flagging approach or the approach proposed by the Commission. To understand why we need to look at the details of the proposed mechanisms.

Both approaches clearly assume that platforms are able to identify matches between uploads and works that rightholder have requested to be blocked in (near) real time. Both the Commission’s proposal and Article § 8 of the German Referentenentwurf assume that users can be notified of a match during the upload process and thus can prevent legitimate uploads from being blocked at upload. While some technology vendors claim to have the ability to reliably match content during the upload, it is currently unclear if the ability to match in (near) real time is widely available to all platforms.

Given the uncertainty about the availability of real-time matching solutions for all types and sizes of platforms, it must be ensured that the use of automated filters is not imposed de facto by national legislators if this could be disproportionate for smaller platforms. The New German proposal does seem to require the use of real-time filters which would make it incompatible with the proportionality requirements in Art 17(5).

The limits of “match-and-flag”


But even if we assume that platforms have the ability to match in real time during the upload, the approach still has limitations. The requirement to make best efforts to prevent the availability of works in Article 17(4)b does not apply only to new uploads: it also applies to uploads that are already on a platform. In situations where rightholders provide platforms with new blocking requests, the platforms will need to make best efforts to identify and remove them as well (this problem will be especially acute at the moment when the directive comes into force). Notifying the uploader of a match and giving her the possibility to flag the upload as legitimate does not offer the same protection here, because it cannot be assumed that the user has the ability to react immediately. This would mean that the upload in question would become unavailable until the uploader has had a chance to object.

This problem is much more pronounced in the new German proposal. The Commission’s proposal makes it clear that platforms are only allowed to automatically remove uploads if a match is “likely infringing”. This means that already uploaded works that do not meet this requirement cannot be removed until either the user has had a chance to react to a notification or until the platform has concluded a human review of the upload in question. The German proposal does not contain such a safeguard, as it requires the automated removal of uploads unless these have been flagged as legitimate during the upload.

This is regardless of whether the match is likely to be infringing or not. In situations where users cannot react to notifications right away, this will result in the removal of substantial amounts of legitimate uploads. Under the previous German pre-flagging mechanism this would not be an issue (with the exception of uploads already on the platform when the German implementation enters into force), because users would have had the ability to flag any legitimate upload as legitimate. The new German proposal only gives them the possibility to flag works as legitimate that are already on a blocklist at the moment of upload.

Towards a combined approach?


As long as this blindspot persists, the new German proposal does not adequately implement the requirement in Article 17(7) that the availability of uploads that do not infringe copyright must not be prevented by measures deployed to implement Article 17(4)b. To fix this, the German legislator should add, to the mechanism provided in §8 of the new proposal, the ability to flag any upload as legitimate after it has been uploaded and that flagged upload cannot be automatically blocked.

This combined approach would provide even stronger safeguards than the Commission’s proposal, which hinges on the idea that it is possible to automatically differentiate between likely infringing and likely legitimate content based on technical parameters.

As we have pointed out in our response to the Commission’s consultation, this approach, while viable in principle, is flawed as long as defining those technical parameters is left to platforms and rightholders without any involvement from users’ organisations. In addition, the proposed “likely infringing” standard does not set a high enough bar for preventing automated removal of potentially legitimate content. Instead, the “identical or equivalent” standard proposed in the academic statement that introduced the idea of “match-and-flag” should be a point of departure. In the case of time based media, this could be operationalised as matches that are at least 20 seconds long and where the match consists of at least 90% of the original work and at least 90% of the upload in question. In addition, matches of indivisible works (such as pictures) and short works (such as short poems) should never be assumed to be infringing, even when they correspond to 100% of an upload.

Meaningful protection for Public Domain and openly licensed works


A final advantage of such a combined approach is that it would also offer real protection from automated blocking for works that are in the public domain or available under open licenses. While such works are free to use for anybody, they are frequently blocked or removed as the result of wrongful ownership claims. In this situation it must be possible for anyone at any time to flag such works as being in the public domain or openly licensed. Given that this status will be the same across all (types of) platforms, such flags should not be recorded by individual platforms but in a public database that must be consulted by any system as part of assessing the status of an upload.

While it may make sense for platforms to use their own private databases when it comes to matching uploads to reference files of works to be blocked, the effective protection of public domain and openly licensed works requires a fully transparent public database that reflects their status as public goods. This public database must be consulted by any system as part of assessing the status of an upload and should be maintained by an independent trusted entity that also offers a conflict resolution mechanism for resolving conflicting claims.

Summary


At this stage, there seems to be some level of convergence towards “match-and-flag” mechanisms as a practical approach to reconciling 17(4) and 17(7). While still exhibiting shortcomings, such an approach would reflect the internal balance of Article 17 that the EU legislator arrived at. In how far a “match-and-flag” mechanism will be able to put this balance into practice depends on its practical implementation. As we have outlined above this means that:
  • There must be high thresholds to presume infringement and consequently permit fully automated blocking of uploads.
  • These thresholds should be based on fully transparent criteria, which users can challenge in court.
  • All matched uploads that do not meet these thresholds must be protected from blocking and flagged uploads must not be removed while under review by the platform.
  • In addition there must be the ability for anyone to pre-flag works that are in the Public Domain or available under an open license via a decentralised public database that must be consulted by any (automated) measures used to comply with Article 17(4).
  • National implementation must contain safeguards that ensure that already existing uploads cannot be blocked automatically.
Finally, it must also be ensured that the use of automated filters is not imposed by national legislators if this would be disproportionate for the platform in question.

The post Taming the upload filters: Pre-flagging vs. match and flag appeared first on International Communia Association.

fsf: In a world where technology can mean the difference between life and death, can we afford the restrictions proprietary software places on progress? Watch "Rewind," our latest video created to celebrate #: https://u.fsf.org/rewind https://status.


In a world where technology can mean the difference between life and death, can we afford the restrictions proprietary software places on progress? Watch "Rewind," our latest video created to celebrate #: https://u.fsf.org/rewind https://status.fsf.org/attachment/2499667
https://status.fsf.org/notice/3139152

Arctotis fastuosa-20200814-RM-114321.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Ermell" on Thu, 08 Oct 2020 19:08:00 GMT
Added to category on Tue, 13 Oct 2020 21:01:12 GMT
Original image: 5055×3886 pixel; 5.426.794 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arctotis_fastuosa-20200814-RM-114321.jpg

Rubus caesius fruit - Keila.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Iifar" on Sat, 26 Sep 2020 10:16:00 GMT
Added to category on Tue, 13 Oct 2020 21:02:52 GMT
Original image: 6000×4000 pixel; 11.305.533 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rubus_caesius_fruit_-_Keila.jpg

Teach a virtual class with Moodle on Linux


Digital images of a computer desktop
The pandemic has created a greater need for remote education than ever before. This makes a learning management system (LMS) like Moodle more important than ever for ensuring that education stays on track as more and more schooling is delivered virtually.

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FCCA EMD JT26CW-2B San Bartolomé.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Kabelleger" on Tue, 06 Oct 2020 20:37:00 GMT
Added to category on Wed, 14 Oct 2020 21:03:25 GMT
Original image: 3773×2515 pixel; 7.475.263 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:FCCA_EMD_JT26CW-2B_San_Bartolom%C3%A9.jpg

Lo sbadiglio.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Alberto Peracchio" on Mon, 04 Jun 2018 16:49:00 GMT
Added to category on Wed, 14 Oct 2020 21:04:44 GMT
Original image: 6000×4000 pixel; 10.048.011 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lo_sbadiglio.jpg

Wikimedia Commons picture of the day for October 15

Picture of the day
Musentempel im Herbst, 1710150958, ako.jpg
The so-called "Musentempel" in the agra park in Markkleeberg (Saxony) on a sunny autumn day.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:FeedItem/potd/20201015000000/en

Learn Python by creating a video game


Arcade games
Python is one of the most popular programming languages out there. Whether you want to learn it for work or for fun, it's a powerful and useful language for any purpose. You can create applications to help you with daily tasks, fun games you and your friends can play, scripts to process data, applications to generate or parse information, and much more.

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Explore the world of programming with Jupyter


Computer laptop in space
JupyterLab is the next-generation web-based Jupyter user interface. It allows you to work with Jupyter Notebooks, as well as editors, terminals, and more, to produce interactive documents for data science, statistical modeling, data visualization, and more.

It has native viewers for PDF, CSV, JSON, images, and more. It is also extensible to support other formats.

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Yellow butterfly on Tagetes lucida.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Basile Morin" on Sat, 01 Aug 2020 10:55:00 GMT
Added to category on Thu, 15 Oct 2020 13:01:44 GMT
Original image: 4266×2844 pixel; 2.532.232 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Yellow_butterfly_on_Tagetes_lucida.jpg

Facing 2020 at the CC Global Summit: A Look at This Year’s Keynotes

Let’s take a moment and step out of the heavy fog that is 2020 and try to look back at the last few months with a new perspective. Through the challenges and uncertainties, we believe there have been opportunities for personal reflection, social solidarity, and care. Of course, we recognize this is not true for everyone, but we certainly hope it’s true for most.

One of the unique challenges for this year’s CC Global Summit was to connect events of the past year with our work—and find a path forward in hope and optimism. We asked: How can we best celebrate “open” and continue to foster the culture of gratitude and collaboration that our work and our community brings? How can we link the challenges we’re facing as a planet (e.g. health, human rights, democracy, etc.) with the opportunities for solutions found in creating a more open and free world?

Alongside the 100+ sessions hosted at this year’s CC Global Summit, we believe the three keynotes will help answer those questions, as well as reshape our perspectives, conversations, and attitudes as we near the end of 2020 and look forward to 2021.

The 2020 CC Global Summit keynotes are:
  • A Culture of Peace: the first keynote, held on Tuesday (12:00 UTC), will foster a necessary discussion on the role “open” plays in advancing peace. Speakers Bushra Ebadi (Canadian Commission for UNESCO), Deepak Ramola (Project FUEL), Leonardo Párraga (Juventudes Por La Paz), and Asha Siad (Memories of Mogadishu) will challenge the audience to critically examine preconceived notions of open access, open culture, and open knowledge, and to understand the role decolonized and democratized conceptions of these terms will serve in building the future we want.
  • Hacer Feminista Lo Abierto: Poniendo Nuevos Engranes a La Cultura Libre (Making Open Feminist: Putting New Gears in Free Culture): the second keynote, held on Wednesday (15:00 UTC), will give Irene Soria (CC Mexico) the stage for exploring new definitions of “open.” Using intersectionality as a framing, Irene will help us navigate the relationships between race, gender, and social class as new ways of seeing the open movement. The session will be in Spanish, but the question and answer period will be in English.
  • Democracy for Sale: the final keynote, on Thursday (15:00 UTC), will have CC’s CEO Catherine Stihler and Board Member Alek Tarkowski speaking with author Peter Geoghegan about his upcoming book, Democracy for Sale. In particular, the panel will discuss how far-right ideology, money, and social media have been used to hollow out modern democracies, particularly in North America and Europe. The links between fighting for our democracies and fighting for “open” and the public interest will be discussed during this conversation.
In one way or another, these keynotes touch on the most compelling questions and challenges we’re facing today and serve as the perfect framing for the entire 2020 CC Global Summit—and for our work as a community moving forward.

The post Facing 2020 at the CC Global Summit: A Look at This Year’s Keynotes appeared first on Creative Commons.


Is open source a development model, business model, or something else?


Net catching 1s and 0s or data in the clouds
The term "open source" was coined in 1998 at a strategy session held by Open Source Initiative (OSI). The OSI maintains the Open Source Definition (OSD), which places mandates on the distribution terms of any software that claims to be open source. The OSI also maintains a curated list of official open source licenses that meet these guidelines.

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Paul Barrere and Fred Tackett Acoustic Duo Live at The North Cafe on 1999-04-02


Image/Photo
Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett The North Cafe, Kawasaki, Japan 1999-04-02 Late Show Audience (Courtesy of Wes Meyette Archive) Lineage: 1st Gen Maxell XLII > Nak Dragon > Sony PCM M10 24/96 Transfer & Editing by Wes Meyette using CD Wave Editor 01 Down on the Farm 02 Two Trains > 03 Rocket in M....

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Domergue's leaf chameleon (Brookesia thieli) Andasibe.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Charlesjsharp" on Sat, 12 Sep 2020 13:31:00 GMT
Added to category on Fri, 16 Oct 2020 13:00:58 GMT
Original image: 3785×2523 pixel; 8.318.602 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Domergue%27s_leaf_chameleon_%28Brookesia_thieli%29_Andasibe.jpg

Club d'Elf Live at The Falcon Live on 2020-10-15


Image/Photo
Club d'Elf 10/15/20 The Falcon Live Marlboro, NY Source-M/S mid AKG460 ck63/side ADKa51tl(8)>1+2 of Mixpre6 AKG ck61's(DIN,in leslie cabinet)AKG active Naiant pfa's>3+4 of Mixpre6 Soundboard>5+6 of Mixpre6 All@24/48>Audacity>cdwav>TLH>Flac16 1.Intro 2.Zeed Al Maal 3.Second Line 4.The Tingler 5.King ....

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https://archive.org/details/delf2020-10-15

Ratdog Live at Landmark Theatre, Syracuse, NY on 1999-11-12


Image/Photo
Bob Weir & RatDog 1999-11-12 Landmark Theatre Syracuse, NY source: AT-822 > Sony D5proM2 > Cass/M location: Loge RC, Row E, Seat 22 transfer: Master Cassette > Sony TC-WE435 > Teac EQA-3 > Tascam DR70d@48/16 > Audacity > .wav taped by: Jon Weir transferred by: Jon Weir tracked and edited by: Rich Le....

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Portas da Cidade, Ponta Delgada, isla de San Miguel, Azores, Portugal, 2020-07-29, DD 123-125 HDR.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Poco a poco" on Mon, 05 Oct 2020 19:13:00 GMT
Added to category on Tue, 06 Oct 2020 21:02:21 GMT
Original image: 7049×4207 pixel; 11.275.297 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portas_da_Cidade%2C_Ponta_Delgada%2C_isla_de_San_Miguel%2C_Azores%2C_Portugal%2C_2020-07-29%2C_DD_123-125_HDR.jpg

Tectarius cumingii 01.JPG


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Llez" on Mon, 03 Sep 2018 07:59:00 GMT
Added to category on Wed, 07 Oct 2020 05:01:30 GMT
Original image: 9500×5908 pixel; 14.160.233 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA,GFDL
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tectarius_cumingii_01.JPG

Tectarius cumingii 01.JPG


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Llez" on Mon, 03 Sep 2018 07:59:00 GMT
Added to category on Wed, 07 Oct 2020 05:01:30 GMT
Original image: 9500×5908 pixel; 14.160.233 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA,GFDL
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tectarius_cumingii_01.JPG

Fungi, Folklore, and Fairyland

From fairy-rings to Lewis Carroll's Alice, mushrooms have long been entwined with the supernatural in art and literature. What might this say about past knowledge of hallucinogenic fungi? Mike Jay looks at early reports of mushroom-induced trips and how one species in particular became established as a stock motif of Victorian fairyland.
https://publicdomainreview.org/essay/fungi-folklore-and-fairyland/


Tibia curta.jpg


Image/Photo
Uploaded by user "Lycaon" on Sun, 25 Mar 2007 17:33:00 GMT
Added to category on Wed, 07 Oct 2020 17:24:47 GMT
Original image: 3600×2700 pixel; 1.245.268 bytes.
Licensing : CC-BY-SA
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tibia_curta.jpg

fsf: Who are your free software heroes? Nominate them for a Free Software Award by October 28th: https://u.fsf.org/357 Check out the presentation of the last round of awards at https://u.fsf.org/32b! https://status.fsf.org/attachment/2168733


Who are your free software heroes? Nominate them for a Free Software Award by October 28th: https://u.fsf.org/357 Check out the presentation of the last round of awards at https://u.fsf.org/32b! https://status.fsf.org/attachment/2168733
https://status.fsf.org/notice/3126991

Grateful Dead Live at Fox Theater on 1978-04-11


Image/Photo
x.

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https://archive.org/details/gd1978-04-11.150607.BettyBoard.Anon.Noel.t-flac16

Protect your network with open source tools


A lock on the side of a building
System integrity is essential, especially when you're charged with safeguarding other people's personal details on your network. It's critical that system administrators are familiar with security tools, whether their purview is a home, a small business, or an organization with hundreds or thousands of employees.

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